Mazda RX 8

Mazda RX 8
CARBARN | Mazda RX 8 | one of the sports car that may be you crave, this car comes from the Japanese manufacturer, this concept is a sports car and is very suitable for young people who want to look more stylish and sports, want to know further information following its 


Mazda RX 8
Mazda RX 8
Most people know that Mazda builds sporty cars. But for driving enthusiasts, it's the company's history of building sport coupes with lightweight rotary engines that sets it apart from the competition. The Mazda RX-8 is the latest of these coupes, and it's the only one with a four-door configuration. The heart of the Mazda RX-8 is its high-revving, 1.3-liter rotary engine called the Renesis. It's a made-up word: The "R" and the "e" stand for "Rotary engine," while "nesis" comes from the word "genesis." Odd name aside, the Renesis engine is an impressive bit of engineering: Unlike its forebears, it locates the exhaust ports on the side of each of the combustion chambers, rather than on the outer edge of the rotary housing. Sounds simple, but this one change allows for more power, higher fuel economy and lower emissions. Because of the engine's compact size, engineers were able to mount it farther back in the RX-8's chassis, giving the car a coveted 50/50 front/rear weight distribution. This, along with balanced suspension tuning, sharp steering and a svelte 3,000-pound curb weight, makes the rear-wheel-drive RX-8 one of the best-handling cars on the market. However, the car's power is a bit lacking; newer competitors provide considerably more oomph.
Mazda RX 8
The Mazda RX-8 is a four-seat coupe with a pair of rear-hinged "suicide" doors that ease access to the rear seats. Every RX-8 is powered by a 1.3-liter twin rotary engine, with an output that depends on the transmission. The six-speed manual version produces 232 horsepower at a stratospheric 9,000 rpm, and is capable of a 0-60 run in about 6 seconds. The six-speed automatic gets 212 hp and a redline of 7,500 rpm. All RX-8s have a rather paltry 152 pound-feet of torque, which means you have to hold the rotary engine on the boil to keep the car lively. Therefore, we'd suggest only buying an RX-8 with the manual. There are three trim levels available: Sport, Grand Touring and R3. Even the base car comes well equipped with 18-inch wheels, performance tires, cruise control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and a six-speaker CD stereo with an auxiliary audio jack. The Grand Touring gets a limited-slip rear differential, automatic xenon headlights, a power driver seat, memory functions, heated seats, leather upholstery, automatic climate control, keyless ignition/entry, a Bose stereo, Bluetooth and a navigation system. The R3 is a high-performance variant packing 19-inch wheels, an aggressively tuned suspension, Recaro sport seats, exterior body modifications and some of the other trims' high-tech convenience features. Although the Mazda RX-8 has the look of a race-tuned sports car, its demeanor on the road is considerably more docile. Its ample grip through corners and solid feedback through the steering wheel make it an absolute riot on a serpentine road, yet a compliant ride means that it won't beat you up on the daily commute. The rotary engine requires high engine speeds to make serious power, but the delivery is virtually vibration-free and noise levels are subdued. If you like a smooth engine (in feel, sound and delivery), the RX-8's is second to none. Inside, the RX-8's innovative two-person backseat and suicide half-doors provide the sort of practicality no other sport coupe can match. Provided they're shorter than 6 feet tall, those seated in the back will find supportive seating and ample room. Overall, the RX-8 is one of the best examples of a car that's both fun to drive and very livable on a day-to-day basis. Just be prepared to pay at the pump, as the high-revving rotary swills fuel like an SUV.

Mazda RX 8
Mazda RX 8
Introduced for 2004, the Mazda RX-8 heralded the return of the rotary-powered sports car to the United States after a near decade-long hiatus. Until 2008, it featured a slightly different exterior design than the present car, while features were gradually added over the years. Initially, the RX-8's automatic transmission was a four-speed unit. We'd avoid this car in favor of the six-speed automatic with paddle shifters available for 2006 and later (although we always recommend the manual first). The Shinka Package (Japanese for "evolution") was offered for '06 and included an aggressively tuned suspension, unique 18-inch wheels, leather/faux suede seating and a few other luxury niceties. The next year, this package was replaced by the 40th Anniversary Special Edition, which offered a special gray exterior, red leather seats, different 18-inch alloy wheels, a firmer suspension and the obligatory badges. The '08 model year also saw the navigation system restricted to the Grand Touring model. The biggest changes came for 2009. The exterior was given a more aggressive face with a much wider grille, and many other more subtle changes. The interior was also given a few minor adjustments here and there. Mostly, the features list expanded at this time. No longer were 16-inch wheels fitted to the base car -- there were 18s across the board -- and items like Bluetooth and an auxiliary audio jack were added to the options list. A much improved touchscreen navigation system replaced the old pop-up unit controlled by console-mounted buttons. This was also the first year for the Mazda RX-8 R3. For 2010, the Touring model, which previously slotted in between the Sport and Grand Touring, was discontinued.

No comments:

Post a Comment